NEWS
DCMS select committee: use sports, not prison, to tackle knife crime
POSTED 15 May 2019 . BY Tom Walker
Sports should be harnessed to help tackle knife crime and gang violence, according to a report by the DCMS Select Committee.

In its Changing Lives: the social impact of participation in culture and sport report, published this week, the cross-party group of MPs said that sporting activities were being "overlooked" – and that custodial sentences do not necessarily rehabilitate young offenders.

The report is the result of an inquiry launched in January 2018, which looked at the positive social impact participation in sport and cultural activities can have – especially in tackling youth crime.

Home Office figures show that the UK is currently in the midst of a knife crime "epidemic", with nearly 300 people falling victim of knife-related homicides in the past 12 months. One in four of the victims of knife-related murders are men aged between 18 and 24 – a disproportionate figure.

According to the report, there are concerns that the statistics demonstrate not just increased levels of crime, but "broader social failings at a community level", in addition to the high likelihood of convicts re-offending after their release from prison.

The report suggests that a new approach should be adopted to tackle knife crime – one which involves communities and, ideally, the involvement of sports or cultural activities.

"Young people need to feel like they are understood and that they have a sense of security in their relationships with others," the report states.

"It is necessary that young people, who may otherwise be susceptible to gang membership, know that there is an alternative community that is available and willing to offer them comprehensive support."

"Community partnerships to create a sense of belonging for young people, through sports and other cultural activities.

"Previous studies have also demonstrated the power of sport and culture to help provide that alternative community for young people who might otherwise be vulnerable to becoming involved in gang violence and criminality, or unable to break their cycle of re-offending following prior convictions."

The report also highlights the effectiveness of sport in preventing crime in the first place.

"Sport can be used to divert young people away from crime, especially those who have limited access to positive adult role models," the report reads.

It also cites examples of successful initiatives to cut crime through sport.

"While it is, by definition, difficult to measure something that has been prevented, evaluation of Fight 4 Peace’s martial arts programmes shows that, over 12 months, their work resulted in 165 crimes being avoided, delivering an estimated £1m worth of savings to the Exchequer, and an additional £2.5m worth of lifetime education and employment impacts," the report states.

"A cricket programme working in Cotgrave, Nottinghamshire reduced juvenile crime and anti-social behaviour by 76 per cent, resulting in an estimated £1.4m saving to the public purse."

Responding to the report, ukactive director of children, young people and families Jack Shakespeare said: “This report rightly recognises that the impact of physical activity and sport is not confined to the purview of DCMS – it stretches across society, from criminal justice and education to health and social cohesion.

“Physical activity offers new opportunities for disengaged young people, with the power to transform their outlook on life, create stronger social connections and improve their physical and mental health.

“If government policy fails to consider physical activity and sport when tackling the gravest social challenges facing our young people today then it is failing full stop."

To access and read the full DCMS report, click here.
RELATED STORIES
Damian Collins to permanently chair the Sport Select Committee


Damian Collins, the Conservative MP for Folkestone and Hythe, has been elected as the chair of the Culture Media and Sport Select Committee.
Sport to tackle youth crime


Sport can provide an effective response to the growing problems of gun and knife crime amongst young people, according to a report by social research company Substance.
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2019

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
Leisure Management - DCMS select committee: use sports, not prison, to tackle knife crime...
20 May 2019 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
HOME
JOBS
NEWS
FEATURES
PRODUCTS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION
PRINT SUBSCRIPTION
ADVERTISE
CONTACT US
Sign up for FREE ezine
Latest news

15 May 2019

DCMS select committee: use sports, not prison, to tackle knife crime
BY Tom Walker

The report suggests that a new approach involving sport and communities should be adopted to tackle knife crime

The report suggests that a new approach involving sport and communities should be adopted to tackle knife crime

Sports should be harnessed to help tackle knife crime and gang violence, according to a report by the DCMS Select Committee.

In its Changing Lives: the social impact of participation in culture and sport report, published this week, the cross-party group of MPs said that sporting activities were being "overlooked" – and that custodial sentences do not necessarily rehabilitate young offenders.

The report is the result of an inquiry launched in January 2018, which looked at the positive social impact participation in sport and cultural activities can have – especially in tackling youth crime.

Home Office figures show that the UK is currently in the midst of a knife crime "epidemic", with nearly 300 people falling victim of knife-related homicides in the past 12 months. One in four of the victims of knife-related murders are men aged between 18 and 24 – a disproportionate figure.

According to the report, there are concerns that the statistics demonstrate not just increased levels of crime, but "broader social failings at a community level", in addition to the high likelihood of convicts re-offending after their release from prison.

The report suggests that a new approach should be adopted to tackle knife crime – one which involves communities and, ideally, the involvement of sports or cultural activities.

"Young people need to feel like they are understood and that they have a sense of security in their relationships with others," the report states.

"It is necessary that young people, who may otherwise be susceptible to gang membership, know that there is an alternative community that is available and willing to offer them comprehensive support."

"Community partnerships to create a sense of belonging for young people, through sports and other cultural activities.

"Previous studies have also demonstrated the power of sport and culture to help provide that alternative community for young people who might otherwise be vulnerable to becoming involved in gang violence and criminality, or unable to break their cycle of re-offending following prior convictions."

The report also highlights the effectiveness of sport in preventing crime in the first place.

"Sport can be used to divert young people away from crime, especially those who have limited access to positive adult role models," the report reads.

It also cites examples of successful initiatives to cut crime through sport.

"While it is, by definition, difficult to measure something that has been prevented, evaluation of Fight 4 Peace’s martial arts programmes shows that, over 12 months, their work resulted in 165 crimes being avoided, delivering an estimated £1m worth of savings to the Exchequer, and an additional £2.5m worth of lifetime education and employment impacts," the report states.

"A cricket programme working in Cotgrave, Nottinghamshire reduced juvenile crime and anti-social behaviour by 76 per cent, resulting in an estimated £1.4m saving to the public purse."

Responding to the report, ukactive director of children, young people and families Jack Shakespeare said: “This report rightly recognises that the impact of physical activity and sport is not confined to the purview of DCMS – it stretches across society, from criminal justice and education to health and social cohesion.

“Physical activity offers new opportunities for disengaged young people, with the power to transform their outlook on life, create stronger social connections and improve their physical and mental health.

“If government policy fails to consider physical activity and sport when tackling the gravest social challenges facing our young people today then it is failing full stop."

To access and read the full DCMS report, click here.



Connect with
Leisure Management
Magazine:
View issue contents
Sign up:
Instant Alerts/zines

Print edition
 

News headlines
CBG Architects complete set of wellness villas in Australia’s spa country
CBG Architects complete set of wellness villas in Australia’s spa country   20 May 2019

Design practice CBG Architects have completed the Hepburn Springs Escape Villas – a set of fourteen short-stay pods in Daylesford, Australia. .... more>>
Koichi Takada's seafront residences to take inspiration from Indonesia's diverse landscapes
Koichi Takada's seafront residences to take inspiration from Indonesia's diverse landscapes   20 May 2019

Sydney-based Japanese architect Koichi Takada has unveiled plans to design a nature-inspired seafront community in Jakarta, Indonesia. The 9,000 sq m .... more>>
Revealed: Foster + Partners' major hotel project with LVMH
Revealed: Foster + Partners' major hotel project with LVMH   20 May 2019

Details have emerged of Foster + Partners' proposed London hotel project with French luxury conglomerate, LVMH. According to documents recently .... more>>
How is Japanese radio helping the over 55s get more physically active?
How is Japanese radio helping the over 55s get more physically active?   20 May 2019

A new collaboration between Sport England, think tank Demos and care and housing provider Anchor Hanover looks to get the over 55s in the UK more .... more>>
UK’s The Massage Company expands into India, with plans for 50 franchise locations
UK’s The Massage Company expands into India, with plans for 50 franchise locations   20 May 2019

UK-based The Massage Company (TMC) has signed a deal with FranGlobal, Asia’s largest franchise reseller, to open 50 massage centres across India, .... more>>
Snøhetta and Blight Rayner selected to design AU$150m theatre in Australia
Snøhetta and Blight Rayner selected to design AU$150m theatre in Australia   20 May 2019

Architecture firms Snøhetta and Blight Rayner have won an international competition to design an AU$150m (US$103.8m, €90m, £81.4m) theatre for the .... more>>
Company profile


Booker by MINDBODY

Booker by Mindbody is an all-in-one management solution to run and grow your spa. Booker gives you access to a powerful tool that will help you promote your business and retain customers.

View full profile>>

Catalogue gallery


Featured Supplier

Can your spa uniforms take the heat?

Can your spa uniforms take the heat?

Combining comfort and style is never easy, but when it comes to the demands of life as a spa therapist in a hot climate can your spa uniforms take the heat? More>>




in this issue

• Leeds: first to lower childhood obesity
• PayAsUGym rebrands as Hussle
• Construction set to begin on Scottish tapestry attraction



Latest jobs

Jobs Search



Membership consultants
Salary: Competitive salary plus benefits
Location: Chichester
Company: Everyone Active
Recreation Assistant
Salary: Up to £8.21 per hour
Location: Kent, England
Company: Mytime Active
Personal Trainer
Salary: 100% of your PT earnings
Location: Wembley, UK
Company: The Gym Group
Diary dates
Powered by leisurediary.com




19-22 May 2019

SPATEC Spring North America

JW Marriott Turnberry Resort & Spa, Miami, United States



Leisure Management magazine 2018 issue 1
Leisure Management
2018 issue 1

View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
  Profile: Stephen Hulme
We look back on the career of Everyone Active CEO Stephen Hulme More>>
  Interview: Sioux-per foods
The Sioux Chef, Sean Sherman, is on a mission to revive indigenous cuisine More>>


Leisure Management magazine 2016 issue 1

Leisure Management
2016 issue 1

View issue contents
View turning pages
Download PDF
  Hospitality: Wasted opportunity
Restaurants take innovative approaches to solve the problem of food surplus More>>
  Social good: Winds of change
Learn about the Change Foundation and the opportunities it creates More>>


Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd