NEWS
Research: older men who play football regularly have cells up to 11 years younger than inactive peers
POSTED 11 Aug 2020 . BY Tom Walker
The study showed that those aged 65 to 80 years – who had played football regularly – had longer telomeres than their inactive counterparts Credit: Shutterstock.com/LightField Studios
Older men who have played football regularly throughout their lives have cells up to 11 years younger than their physically inactive peers.

The figure comes from a study by a group of Danish researchers, which suggests that physical activity can keep biological ageing at bay.

For the study, which is published in the latest issue of US journal Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, the researchers investigated the length of telomeres – an expression of the biological age of a cell. The shorter the telomere, the older the cell.

The study, which was based on 140 men, showed that those aged 65 to 80 years – who had played football regularly – had longer telomeres than their inactive counterparts.

The elderly footballers had 2.5 per cent higher granulocyte telomere length and 1.3 per cent higher lymphocyte telomere length compared to inactive men of the same age. The footballers also had 37 per cent lower mRNA expression of the pro-senescent factor p16 (a cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene), when compared to those who were inactive.

“The older football players were in excellent physical shape, which was manifested in the younger biological age in the cells,” said Peter Krustrup, professor at the Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics at University of Southern Denmark, which undertook the study.

"This is the first cross-sectional, controlled trial showing the effects of lifelong football participation on telomere shortening and senescence markers in circulating cells.

"It suggests that football induces cellular anti-senescence mechanisms implying positive long-term cardiovascular health effects."

• To read more about the study, click here.
 


CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2020

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
Leisure Management - Research: older men who play football regularly have cells up to 11 years younger than inactive peers...
23 Sep 2020 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
HOME
JOBS
NEWS
FEATURES
PRODUCTS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION
PRINT SUBSCRIPTION
ADVERTISE
CONTACT US
Sign up for FREE ezine
Latest news

11 Aug 2020

Research: older men who play football regularly have cells up to 11 years younger than inactive peers
BY Tom Walker

The study showed that those aged 65 to 80 years – who had played football regularly – had longer telomeres than their inactive counterparts

The study showed that those aged 65 to 80 years – who had played football regularly – had longer telomeres than their inactive counterparts
photo: Shutterstock.com/LightField Studios

Older men who have played football regularly throughout their lives have cells up to 11 years younger than their physically inactive peers.

The figure comes from a study by a group of Danish researchers, which suggests that physical activity can keep biological ageing at bay.

For the study, which is published in the latest issue of US journal Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, the researchers investigated the length of telomeres – an expression of the biological age of a cell. The shorter the telomere, the older the cell.

The study, which was based on 140 men, showed that those aged 65 to 80 years – who had played football regularly – had longer telomeres than their inactive counterparts.

The elderly footballers had 2.5 per cent higher granulocyte telomere length and 1.3 per cent higher lymphocyte telomere length compared to inactive men of the same age. The footballers also had 37 per cent lower mRNA expression of the pro-senescent factor p16 (a cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene), when compared to those who were inactive.

“The older football players were in excellent physical shape, which was manifested in the younger biological age in the cells,” said Peter Krustrup, professor at the Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics at University of Southern Denmark, which undertook the study.

"This is the first cross-sectional, controlled trial showing the effects of lifelong football participation on telomere shortening and senescence markers in circulating cells.

"It suggests that football induces cellular anti-senescence mechanisms implying positive long-term cardiovascular health effects."

• To read more about the study, click here.



Connect with
Leisure Management
Magazine:
View issue contents
Sign up:
Instant Alerts/zines

Print edition
 

News headlines
Bear Grylls leads activities on another successful National Fitness Day
Bear Grylls leads activities on another successful National Fitness Day   23 Sep 2020

The UK's physical activity sector has come together to get millions of people active during National Fitness Day 2020. Gyms, leisure facilities and .... more>>
Color Up launches CBD education programme for wellness professionals and new scholarship scheme
Color Up launches CBD education programme for wellness professionals and new scholarship scheme   23 Sep 2020

CBD-infused skincare line, Color Up has announced a new CBD training course and scholarship programme. The company has added to its existing .... more>>
Exercise and depression – promising research published
Exercise and depression – promising research published   23 Sep 2020

A study by Rutgers University has suggested that it could be possible to predict which young adults with major depression would benefit most from .... more>>
Pinewood Studios, home to James Bond and Star Wars, set to house major visitor attraction
Pinewood Studios, home to James Bond and Star Wars, set to house major visitor attraction   23 Sep 2020

The UK's best-known film studio, used for the filming of blockbusters such as the James Bond and Star Wars franchises, is set to house a major new .... more>>
California gyms sue state over COVID-19 closures
California gyms sue state over COVID-19 closures   22 Sep 2020

Health club and gyms operators in California are suing state governor Gavin Newsom in an attempt to reopen the state’s fitness facilities. The .... more>>
GWS appoints ­fitness industry thought leader, C. Victor Brick, to advisory board
GWS appoints ­fitness industry thought leader, C. Victor Brick, to advisory board   22 Sep 2020

The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) has announced the appointment of C. Victor Brick, CEO of Planet Fitness Growth Partners (PFGP) and chair of the John .... more>>
Company profile


Bungee Super Fly



View full profile>>

Catalogue gallery


Featured Supplier

The Virtual Revolution: Hutchison Technologies help operators motivate members

The Virtual Revolution: Hutchison Technologies help operators motivate members

Hutchison Technologies virtual solutions are helping operators expand their virtual offering and get motivated members back into the club. More>>




in this issue

• Gyms on the high street – it's a go!
• JD Gyms buys Xercise4Less out of administration
• Family operator, GetSetGo! reveals launch plans



Latest jobs

Jobs Search



Personal trainers
Salary: Unlimited earning potential
Location: Chichester, UK
Company: Everyone Active
Personal trainers
Salary: Unlimited earning potential
Location: Midhurst, UK
Company: Everyone Active
Personal trainers
Salary: Unlimited earning potential
Location: Southbourne, UK
Company: Everyone Active
Diary dates
Powered by leisurediary.com

21-24 Sep 2020

SIBEC North America

Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States



Leisure Management magazine 2018 issue 1
Leisure Management
2018 issue 1

View issue contents
View on turning pages
Download PDF
  Promotional feature: Alliance Leisure
The future of leisure in times of austerity More>>
  Environment: Back to nature
British wildlife is being attacked on many fronts. Stephanie Hilborne, CEO of The Wildlife Trusts, wants to involve everyone in preserving nature More>>


Leisure Management magazine 2016 issue 1

Leisure Management
2016 issue 1

View issue contents
View turning pages
Download PDF
  Hospitality: Wasted opportunity
Restaurants take innovative approaches to solve the problem of food surplus More>>
  Regeneration: High ideals
In Utah, a bunch of hip entrepreneurs is creating a crowdfunded ski resort More>>


Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd