Letters

By Katie Barnes | Published in Spa Business 2013 issue 3


Do you have a strong opinion, or disagree with somebody else’s point of view on topics related to the spa industry? If so, Spa Business would love to hear from you. Email your letters, thoughts and suggestions to [email protected]

Cellulite Machines Trending In The UAE

Lindsay Madden-Nadeau, regional spa director UAE, Minor International

It was interesting to read how skincare analysis machines are becoming popular in spas (see SB13/2 p94) – in the UAE we’re seeing a rise in machine-based treatments but with a focus on the body. Such machines include LPG and VelaShape which work in similar ways to target cellulite breakdown, body contouring, fluid retention and to firm up the muscles.

Our customers, with busy lifestyles, want quick fixes and technology keeps getting better. Cavitation is something that people aren’t too aware of. It uses low frequency, ultrasound vibrations that are designed to eventually dissolve cellulite into liquid. I’ve found it one of the most effective in treating cellulite, but it’s also expensive – my three sessions cost AED300-AED400 (US$82-US$109, €62-€82, £52-£69) each.

It’s claimed that Lipoglaze uses cryotherapy to crystalise fat and reduce it by up to 26 per cent. However, it’s another step up in expense – the one-off treatment is AED4,000 (US$1,100, €822, £694), and takes up to six weeks to see the results and leave skin red for sometime after. Meanwhile, the very latest arrival is i-Lipo, which uses low level lasers to trigger a chemical signal to break. It’s so new I’ve yet to try it.

Units can cost AED40,000-AED300,000 (US$10,900-US$81,700, €8,200-€61,600, £7,000-£52,650), but if they’re placed in the right spa and awareness is high they pay for themselves quickly and clients normally sign up for a course of five to 15 sessions.

Most of the machines have clinical trials behind them, but nothing in life is a guarantee and various body types respond differently. Rather than being viewed as a one-time fix, we believe they work best in combination with a healthy diet and a regular fitness programme. Even though results can vary, it’s clear that these machines are definitely around to stay and are likely to get better by the year.

 



There’s a high demand for treatments like Liopglaze, which freezes fat, in the Middle East
What’s In A Name?

Steve Capellini, spa therapist, consultant and author, Royal Treatment Enterprises

What does ‘spa’ mean? As debated in your magazine (see SB12/4 p26), does it mean wellness or pampering? Therapy or indulgence? Unfortunately, in my hometown of Miami, it’s increasingly used to signify Asian massage parlours. Meanwhile, for millions of others, the word spa signifies not much more than a hair salon with a massage room.

For those who work in the industry, ‘spa’ means so much more – it signifies healing, rejuvenation, meaningful connections and, more than anything, hope.
One enterprise that’s given me hope is Himalayan Healers (see SB07/2 p44). Founded in 2006 by American Rob Buckley, this is the first massage school in Nepal where ‘untouchables’ from the lowest social orders are taught the art of touch and find good jobs in spas. Buckley’s selfless work has dramatically improved over a hundred people’s lives in the most dire circumstances. He worked with what he had amidst poverty, corruption, and ill-health to create something truly beautiful.

It’s an inspiring example of how we can work with what we’ve got to create something that lives up to that hope.

 



In Nepal, the word spa can mean ‘hope’
Equal Treatment For People With Cancer

Naomi Quarrell, spa manager, Gaia Retreat & Spa

Cancer is so diverse with so many variables. This is a time that support is needed most and I was pleased to see the topic covered in Spa Business (see SB13/2 p24)

We don’t treat our cancer guests any differently to others: everyone’s treated on an individual basis and equally cared for. Spas shouldn’t shy away from discussing the cancer as it assists the therapist to give the best support and most appropriate treatment.

Training and experience is a major factor in client and therapist confidence, so we have practitioners specifically trained to support those dealing with cancer.

There are a number of treatments they can enjoy including massage, beauty treatments, Chinese medicine, hypnotherapy, spiritual healing, oncology massage and lymphatic drainage. Sometimes the greatest comfort can come through touch alone.

However, it’s important to know the limitations and make these clear. We take guidance from the guest’s GP. In most cases a doctor’s certificate isn’t required, but there are always exceptions to the rule and so these would be assessed on an individual basis.

If spas are open to this market, they need to let it be known that they welcome cancer sufferers, although it’s important that they make the distinction of not being a medical facility, with medical staff on site. Olivia Newton-John, an ambassador for cancer awareness worldwide, is one of our directors at Gaia (see SB10/3 p46), but has also opened her own cancer and wellness hospital in Melbourne and it is important for us to maintain the distinction.

 



Gaia, in Australia, openly welcomes guests who have or have had cancer
 


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SELECTED ISSUE
Spa Business
2013 issue 3

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Leisure Management -



Letters
Katie Barnes, Spa Business

Do you have a strong opinion, or disagree with somebody else’s point of view on topics related to the spa industry? If so, Spa Business would love to hear from you. Email your letters, thoughts and suggestions to [email protected]

Cellulite Machines Trending In The UAE

Lindsay Madden-Nadeau, regional spa director UAE, Minor International

It was interesting to read how skincare analysis machines are becoming popular in spas (see SB13/2 p94) – in the UAE we’re seeing a rise in machine-based treatments but with a focus on the body. Such machines include LPG and VelaShape which work in similar ways to target cellulite breakdown, body contouring, fluid retention and to firm up the muscles.

Our customers, with busy lifestyles, want quick fixes and technology keeps getting better. Cavitation is something that people aren’t too aware of. It uses low frequency, ultrasound vibrations that are designed to eventually dissolve cellulite into liquid. I’ve found it one of the most effective in treating cellulite, but it’s also expensive – my three sessions cost AED300-AED400 (US$82-US$109, €62-€82, £52-£69) each.

It’s claimed that Lipoglaze uses cryotherapy to crystalise fat and reduce it by up to 26 per cent. However, it’s another step up in expense – the one-off treatment is AED4,000 (US$1,100, €822, £694), and takes up to six weeks to see the results and leave skin red for sometime after. Meanwhile, the very latest arrival is i-Lipo, which uses low level lasers to trigger a chemical signal to break. It’s so new I’ve yet to try it.

Units can cost AED40,000-AED300,000 (US$10,900-US$81,700, €8,200-€61,600, £7,000-£52,650), but if they’re placed in the right spa and awareness is high they pay for themselves quickly and clients normally sign up for a course of five to 15 sessions.

Most of the machines have clinical trials behind them, but nothing in life is a guarantee and various body types respond differently. Rather than being viewed as a one-time fix, we believe they work best in combination with a healthy diet and a regular fitness programme. Even though results can vary, it’s clear that these machines are definitely around to stay and are likely to get better by the year.

 



There’s a high demand for treatments like Liopglaze, which freezes fat, in the Middle East
What’s In A Name?

Steve Capellini, spa therapist, consultant and author, Royal Treatment Enterprises

What does ‘spa’ mean? As debated in your magazine (see SB12/4 p26), does it mean wellness or pampering? Therapy or indulgence? Unfortunately, in my hometown of Miami, it’s increasingly used to signify Asian massage parlours. Meanwhile, for millions of others, the word spa signifies not much more than a hair salon with a massage room.

For those who work in the industry, ‘spa’ means so much more – it signifies healing, rejuvenation, meaningful connections and, more than anything, hope.
One enterprise that’s given me hope is Himalayan Healers (see SB07/2 p44). Founded in 2006 by American Rob Buckley, this is the first massage school in Nepal where ‘untouchables’ from the lowest social orders are taught the art of touch and find good jobs in spas. Buckley’s selfless work has dramatically improved over a hundred people’s lives in the most dire circumstances. He worked with what he had amidst poverty, corruption, and ill-health to create something truly beautiful.

It’s an inspiring example of how we can work with what we’ve got to create something that lives up to that hope.

 



In Nepal, the word spa can mean ‘hope’
Equal Treatment For People With Cancer

Naomi Quarrell, spa manager, Gaia Retreat & Spa

Cancer is so diverse with so many variables. This is a time that support is needed most and I was pleased to see the topic covered in Spa Business (see SB13/2 p24)

We don’t treat our cancer guests any differently to others: everyone’s treated on an individual basis and equally cared for. Spas shouldn’t shy away from discussing the cancer as it assists the therapist to give the best support and most appropriate treatment.

Training and experience is a major factor in client and therapist confidence, so we have practitioners specifically trained to support those dealing with cancer.

There are a number of treatments they can enjoy including massage, beauty treatments, Chinese medicine, hypnotherapy, spiritual healing, oncology massage and lymphatic drainage. Sometimes the greatest comfort can come through touch alone.

However, it’s important to know the limitations and make these clear. We take guidance from the guest’s GP. In most cases a doctor’s certificate isn’t required, but there are always exceptions to the rule and so these would be assessed on an individual basis.

If spas are open to this market, they need to let it be known that they welcome cancer sufferers, although it’s important that they make the distinction of not being a medical facility, with medical staff on site. Olivia Newton-John, an ambassador for cancer awareness worldwide, is one of our directors at Gaia (see SB10/3 p46), but has also opened her own cancer and wellness hospital in Melbourne and it is important for us to maintain the distinction.

 



Gaia, in Australia, openly welcomes guests who have or have had cancer

Originally published in Spa Business 2013 issue 3

Published by Leisure Media Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd