Letters
Write to reply

Wearable devices complement a health club’s offering


I completely agree with Bryan O’Rourke (HCM Sept 13, p68) that wearable technology can create unique opportunities for health clubs and drive down healthcare costs. However, he also said such tracking devices come with risks such as increased competition. In my mind, while this is a valid point, the risks are far outweighed by the opportunities.

Operators are all keen to find ways to attract new types of members, and keep existing ones for longer. Tracking technologies have a clear role to play in achieving this. Wearables with online platforms present clear opportunities to build propositions that attract those who see the gym as unappealing, and that enhance the experience of casual members who eventually quit. The technology allows operators and PTs to build loyalty through holistic, lifestyle-based programmes that have no physical boundaries – that do not require exercise to be carried out in-club.

The industry must embrace wearable technology, viewing it as a complement to current offerings rather than worrying it could cannibalise potential members. It won’t. Holmes Place International has used Fitbug for three years and proven the hypothesis: new corporate memberships appeal to the ‘hard to reach’ who would never previously have joined, while traditional members feel cared about, however and wherever they choose to exercise. The technology also gives access to members 24/7 to maintain engagement and motivation – a marketer’s dream. 

Ignore wearables at your peril. Build them into your propositions, else they may simply be seen as an alternative.

Paul Landau, Founder and CEO, Fitbug

Clubs should consider creating balance centres

For the first time in history, there are now more people in the US who are over the age of 45 than there are under. Because of this, many new opportunities are available for fitness and healthcare. One such opportunity is a balance centre.

It’s a fact that few older people are screened by their physicians for balance issues until they fall. One in three people older than 65 will fall this year, and 50 per cent will fall again in the next 12 months. Once an individual has fallen, the fear associated with falling again can lead to social isolation, depression and a downward spiral in health.

There’s a clear role for health clubs to play here, as studies suggest strength and balance training programmes could reduce the number of falls by up to 40 per cent. Under-utilised space in-club could be turned into a balance centre, assessing clients and – provided their doctor is in agreement (findings should be discussed with their GP before proceeding) – offering personalised programmes led by balance training specialists.

Given the growth of the over-65 age group, there’s huge potential to turn such a balance centre into a strong profit centre for your club.

Colin Milner
CEO, ICAA

 



A third of over-65s fall each year
 


CONTACT US

Leisure Media
Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2021

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
23 Jun 2021 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
HOME
JOBS
NEWS
FEATURES
PRODUCTS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION
PRINT SUBSCRIPTION
ADVERTISE
CONTACT US
Sign up for FREE ezine

Features List



SELECTED ISSUE
Health Club Management
2014 issue 1

View issue contents

Leisure Management - Write to reply

Letters

Write to reply


Wearable devices complement a health club’s offering

Wearable technology enables clubs to build loyalty beyond their four walls

I completely agree with Bryan O’Rourke (HCM Sept 13, p68) that wearable technology can create unique opportunities for health clubs and drive down healthcare costs. However, he also said such tracking devices come with risks such as increased competition. In my mind, while this is a valid point, the risks are far outweighed by the opportunities.

Operators are all keen to find ways to attract new types of members, and keep existing ones for longer. Tracking technologies have a clear role to play in achieving this. Wearables with online platforms present clear opportunities to build propositions that attract those who see the gym as unappealing, and that enhance the experience of casual members who eventually quit. The technology allows operators and PTs to build loyalty through holistic, lifestyle-based programmes that have no physical boundaries – that do not require exercise to be carried out in-club.

The industry must embrace wearable technology, viewing it as a complement to current offerings rather than worrying it could cannibalise potential members. It won’t. Holmes Place International has used Fitbug for three years and proven the hypothesis: new corporate memberships appeal to the ‘hard to reach’ who would never previously have joined, while traditional members feel cared about, however and wherever they choose to exercise. The technology also gives access to members 24/7 to maintain engagement and motivation – a marketer’s dream. 

Ignore wearables at your peril. Build them into your propositions, else they may simply be seen as an alternative.

Paul Landau, Founder and CEO, Fitbug

Clubs should consider creating balance centres

For the first time in history, there are now more people in the US who are over the age of 45 than there are under. Because of this, many new opportunities are available for fitness and healthcare. One such opportunity is a balance centre.

It’s a fact that few older people are screened by their physicians for balance issues until they fall. One in three people older than 65 will fall this year, and 50 per cent will fall again in the next 12 months. Once an individual has fallen, the fear associated with falling again can lead to social isolation, depression and a downward spiral in health.

There’s a clear role for health clubs to play here, as studies suggest strength and balance training programmes could reduce the number of falls by up to 40 per cent. Under-utilised space in-club could be turned into a balance centre, assessing clients and – provided their doctor is in agreement (findings should be discussed with their GP before proceeding) – offering personalised programmes led by balance training specialists.

Given the growth of the over-65 age group, there’s huge potential to turn such a balance centre into a strong profit centre for your club.

Colin Milner
CEO, ICAA

 



A third of over-65s fall each year

Originally published in Health Club Management 2014 issue 1

Published by Leisure Media Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd