News Feature
EU Referendum

Will ‘Brexit’ affect EU funding for grassroots sport?


In the last two years, Britain has benefitted from £1.5m of ERASMUS+ funding – will it dry up if we leave the EU?

Since prime minister David Cameron fired the starting gun on the EU referendum debate by announcing that Britain would be going to the polls on the 23 June 2016, individuals in favour the status quo and those preferring ‘Brexit’ have generally centred their arguments around the economy, jobs, national security and immigration.

But the result of the referendum could have further reaching implications than the headline issues. Sport – and the funding of grassroots sport in particular – has the potential to be affected if Britain decides to leave Europe.

Talking to Sports Management, Sport and Recreation Alliance chief executive Emma Boggis said that the UK would find it “much more difficult to access EU funding streams designed to support sport”, highlighting the ERASMUS+ programme and the EU Structural Funds.

According to executive director of Britain Stronger In Europe, Will Straw, Britain has benefitted from £1.5m (US$2.1m, €1.9m) of ERASMUS+ sports funding in the past two years. Indeed, the current programme period for ERASMUS+ funding – 2014-2020 – has a total budget of €270m (£210.3m, US$293.1m) for all member nations.

“Thanks to the ERASMUS+ programme, anyone in Britain who comes up with a brilliant sports project can receive money from the EU to help get it off the ground,” added Straw.

However, while all ERASMUS+ programme is open to all 28 states in the EU, five non-members are eligible to bid for funding – Macedonia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Turkey – meaning that if Britain does divorce itself from the Common Market it does not necessarily lose the opportunity to bid for EU grassroots funding.

“Non-EU countries like Iceland and Norway take part in the ERASMUS+ programme. To suggest that we would be denied access to this after we Vote Leave is scaremongering,” said a Vote Leave spokesperson, who told Sports Management that if Britain left the EU some of the “£350m (US$487.7m, €449.2m) it sends to Brussels each week” would be ploughed into “our priorities such as grassroots sport”.

Culture secretary John Whittingdale (far left) is a member of Vote Leave
Will Straw, Britain Stronger in Europe
 


CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2020

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
29 Sep 2020 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
HOME
JOBS
NEWS
FEATURES
PRODUCTS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION
PRINT SUBSCRIPTION
ADVERTISE
CONTACT US
Sign up for FREE ezine

Features List



SELECTED ISSUE
Sports Management
07 Mar 2016 issue 115

View issue contents

Leisure Management - EU Referendum

News Feature

EU Referendum


Will ‘Brexit’ affect EU funding for grassroots sport?

Emma Boggis, chief exec of the SRA
Culture secretary John Whittingdale (far left) is a member of Vote Leave
Will Straw, Britain Stronger in Europe

In the last two years, Britain has benefitted from £1.5m of ERASMUS+ funding – will it dry up if we leave the EU?

Since prime minister David Cameron fired the starting gun on the EU referendum debate by announcing that Britain would be going to the polls on the 23 June 2016, individuals in favour the status quo and those preferring ‘Brexit’ have generally centred their arguments around the economy, jobs, national security and immigration.

But the result of the referendum could have further reaching implications than the headline issues. Sport – and the funding of grassroots sport in particular – has the potential to be affected if Britain decides to leave Europe.

Talking to Sports Management, Sport and Recreation Alliance chief executive Emma Boggis said that the UK would find it “much more difficult to access EU funding streams designed to support sport”, highlighting the ERASMUS+ programme and the EU Structural Funds.

According to executive director of Britain Stronger In Europe, Will Straw, Britain has benefitted from £1.5m (US$2.1m, €1.9m) of ERASMUS+ sports funding in the past two years. Indeed, the current programme period for ERASMUS+ funding – 2014-2020 – has a total budget of €270m (£210.3m, US$293.1m) for all member nations.

“Thanks to the ERASMUS+ programme, anyone in Britain who comes up with a brilliant sports project can receive money from the EU to help get it off the ground,” added Straw.

However, while all ERASMUS+ programme is open to all 28 states in the EU, five non-members are eligible to bid for funding – Macedonia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Turkey – meaning that if Britain does divorce itself from the Common Market it does not necessarily lose the opportunity to bid for EU grassroots funding.

“Non-EU countries like Iceland and Norway take part in the ERASMUS+ programme. To suggest that we would be denied access to this after we Vote Leave is scaremongering,” said a Vote Leave spokesperson, who told Sports Management that if Britain left the EU some of the “£350m (US$487.7m, €449.2m) it sends to Brussels each week” would be ploughed into “our priorities such as grassroots sport”.


Originally published in Sports Management 07 Mar 2016 issue 115

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd