Editor's letter
Shifting boundaries

Today’s increasingly anxious, distracted consumers are looking to wellness for answers. That means the role of the spa industry must change with the times – or risk getting left behind

By Jane Kitchen | Published in Spa Business Handbook 2019 issue 1


We are living in a time where wellness is fast becoming a part of more and more people’s everyday lives – and our role in the spa industry is shifting and changing with the times. Today’s increasingly distracted, anxious, technologically addled public is looking to wellness to help them feel better, and that means spas must look beyond the typical massage and facial menu they’ve relied on for so many years and get creative with their offerings for a new generation of consumers who want wellness everywhere.

From the influence of the ‘experience generation’ on spa design (see page 74) to the explosion of wellness rooms across some of the biggest hotel brands in the industry (see page 98), wellness is infiltrating areas that were once the domain of other segments of hospitality.

Spas are also shifting in scope and nature – mental wellness is becoming increasingly important to spas (see page 96), which are tackling things like loneliness and anxiety through breathwork classes, artistic workshops, and initiatives that foster social connections (see page 78).

Regionally, the spa industry is seeing changes as well; the US market is finally embracing large, co-ed hydrothermal facilities (see page 108), the Asia-Pacific spa industry is poised for rapid growth (see page 90), and in the Middle East, areas like Saudi Arabia and Oman are giving Dubai a run for the money (see page 122).

And as climate change looms ever-present on the horizon (see page 12), spas that put the environment first will find themselves at the forefront of the industry, and will be popular with a new generation of environmentally enlightened spa-goers as they age into adulthood (see page 86). Meanwhile, we all seem to be longing for a bit of nature these days – outdoor spa gardens are popping up everywhere (see page 16), and forest bathing has taken on a life of its own (see page 20), as more and more of us seek the simplest, truest sense of wellness – a connection with the earth, with nature, and with ourselves.

 


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16 Nov 2019 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
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Leisure Management - Shifting boundaries

Editor's letter

Shifting boundaries


Today’s increasingly anxious, distracted consumers are looking to wellness for answers. That means the role of the spa industry must change with the times – or risk getting left behind

Jane Kitchen, Spa Business

We are living in a time where wellness is fast becoming a part of more and more people’s everyday lives – and our role in the spa industry is shifting and changing with the times. Today’s increasingly distracted, anxious, technologically addled public is looking to wellness to help them feel better, and that means spas must look beyond the typical massage and facial menu they’ve relied on for so many years and get creative with their offerings for a new generation of consumers who want wellness everywhere.

From the influence of the ‘experience generation’ on spa design (see page 74) to the explosion of wellness rooms across some of the biggest hotel brands in the industry (see page 98), wellness is infiltrating areas that were once the domain of other segments of hospitality.

Spas are also shifting in scope and nature – mental wellness is becoming increasingly important to spas (see page 96), which are tackling things like loneliness and anxiety through breathwork classes, artistic workshops, and initiatives that foster social connections (see page 78).

Regionally, the spa industry is seeing changes as well; the US market is finally embracing large, co-ed hydrothermal facilities (see page 108), the Asia-Pacific spa industry is poised for rapid growth (see page 90), and in the Middle East, areas like Saudi Arabia and Oman are giving Dubai a run for the money (see page 122).

And as climate change looms ever-present on the horizon (see page 12), spas that put the environment first will find themselves at the forefront of the industry, and will be popular with a new generation of environmentally enlightened spa-goers as they age into adulthood (see page 86). Meanwhile, we all seem to be longing for a bit of nature these days – outdoor spa gardens are popping up everywhere (see page 16), and forest bathing has taken on a life of its own (see page 20), as more and more of us seek the simplest, truest sense of wellness – a connection with the earth, with nature, and with ourselves.


Originally published in Spa Business Handbook 2019 edition

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd