Editor's letter
Planning for disaster

Climate change is increasing the occurrence of natural catastrophes and putting pressure on the insurance industry, meaning it’s never been more vital for all attractions to have effective disaster plans in place

By Liz Terry | Published in Attractions Management 2019 issue 4


We work in a very life-affirming industry, committed to creating peak experiences for people that form some of their most valued and precious memories.

With such a positive mindset running through the sector, it’s understandably tempting to always hope for the best and to focus on innovation, outreach, development, and growth, rather than spending time imagining the many disasters that could befall even the best prepared.

So when things go wrong and a backward step is forced on us in the form of some kind of incident, it can be jarring from the point of view of organisation culture and leave attractions operators very exposed if emergency planning hasn’t been top of the to-do list.

In this issue, we talk to attractions that have had to face huge challenges and setbacks as a result of fires, floods, earthquakes, and accidents (see page 74). We hear firsthand how they dealt with the challenges they faced and what they learned from these experiences.

It takes a generous spirit to share stories of failure and catastrophe, so we’re grateful to our contributors for sharing their stories and their hard-won advice.

It’s easy to think big national institutions must have things like disaster planning all sewn up, yet this is clearly not always the case, as was illustrated in September 2018, when the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro suffered a catastrophic fire that destroyed most of its two million artifacts. Firefighters didn’t have enough water because two hydrants were dry and 200 years of history went up in flames.

The two biggest challenges in relation to preparedness are having an effective and regularly-updated disaster management plan which can be rapidly implemented and getting decent, affordable insurance which will be a help rather than a hindrance when it comes to making a claim.

With climate change increasing the frequency of disasters, the insurance industry is being squeezed and that squeeze is being passed on to customers, making claiming ever more complex and challenging: it took Christchurch museum seven years to settle after the earthquake, for example.

Attractions that are prepared cope the best, so if your disaster planning needs work, now really is the time to act.

 


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Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2019

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SELECTED ISSUE
Attractions Management
2019 issue 4

View issue contents

Leisure Management - Planning for disaster

Editor's letter

Planning for disaster


Climate change is increasing the occurrence of natural catastrophes and putting pressure on the insurance industry, meaning it’s never been more vital for all attractions to have effective disaster plans in place

Liz Terry, Leisure Media
Miami Zoo’s hurricane plan ensures a safe refuge for everyone

We work in a very life-affirming industry, committed to creating peak experiences for people that form some of their most valued and precious memories.

With such a positive mindset running through the sector, it’s understandably tempting to always hope for the best and to focus on innovation, outreach, development, and growth, rather than spending time imagining the many disasters that could befall even the best prepared.

So when things go wrong and a backward step is forced on us in the form of some kind of incident, it can be jarring from the point of view of organisation culture and leave attractions operators very exposed if emergency planning hasn’t been top of the to-do list.

In this issue, we talk to attractions that have had to face huge challenges and setbacks as a result of fires, floods, earthquakes, and accidents (see page 74). We hear firsthand how they dealt with the challenges they faced and what they learned from these experiences.

It takes a generous spirit to share stories of failure and catastrophe, so we’re grateful to our contributors for sharing their stories and their hard-won advice.

It’s easy to think big national institutions must have things like disaster planning all sewn up, yet this is clearly not always the case, as was illustrated in September 2018, when the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro suffered a catastrophic fire that destroyed most of its two million artifacts. Firefighters didn’t have enough water because two hydrants were dry and 200 years of history went up in flames.

The two biggest challenges in relation to preparedness are having an effective and regularly-updated disaster management plan which can be rapidly implemented and getting decent, affordable insurance which will be a help rather than a hindrance when it comes to making a claim.

With climate change increasing the frequency of disasters, the insurance industry is being squeezed and that squeeze is being passed on to customers, making claiming ever more complex and challenging: it took Christchurch museum seven years to settle after the earthquake, for example.

Attractions that are prepared cope the best, so if your disaster planning needs work, now really is the time to act.


Originally published in Attractions Management 2019 issue 4

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd