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Do you have a strong opinion, or disagree with somebody else’s point of view on topics related to the spa industry? If so, Spa Business would love to hear from you. Email your letters, thoughts and suggestions to [email protected]


A movement away from minimalist spas
Beverley Bayes, creative director, Sparcstudio
Beverley Bayes

Having worked on some of the top UK spas for the last decade, we’re witnessing a shift in design – away from formal and minimalist settings towards those with ‘heart and soul’.

The choice of finishes is moving away from plush and bling, for example, towards natural raw materials that recreate the kind of barefoot luxury found in island resorts. Think honed Forest Green marble rather than highly polished Calacatta marble, end grain timbers, green slate and terracotta tiles in interesting formats. There will also be a sway towards incorporating handmade, locally-sourced materials, artwork and furniture.

Rendered walls will give spas a new-found freedom for creating organic shapes using modern stone and polished plaster which, for instance, mimic the smoothness of Moroccan tadelakt. Concealed lighting will progressively replace spot and down lighting to give a softer, more integrated look and full spectrum bulbs means intensity can subtly change throughout the day in accordance to circadian rhythms.

We also expect to see natural swimming pools featuring freshwater and filtered by plants become an essential element for eco-conscious operators.

New luxury is about nurture, care, comfort, relaxation and connecting with nature.

There’s a sway towards handmade, locally-sourced materials, artwork and furniture in spas like South Lodge
Lithuania to become most well-known European spa destination
Eglé Ruksenaite, owner & founder, The E77 Company
Eglé Ruksenaite

The history of health prevention and medical spa towns, using local therapeutic mineral water and mud, dates back over 200 years in Lithuania.

However, while many spas were once owned and operated by the state, an economic crisis in the 1990s meant existing infrastructure was acquired by private companies. And in the next two years alone, another 13 spa hotels and wellness destinations are planned in the country. We’re consulting on more than half of these and, according to our calculations, total investments should amount to €90.5m (US$100.7m, £77.4m).

Today, people are visiting spa towns such as Birstonas, Druskininkai, Anyksciai and Palanga not just for rehabilitation, but also for health prevention and relaxation. Spas are treating contemporary ailments such as chronic fatigue and insomnia and many are adapting services to meet the needs of a younger generation and families.

With modernisation Lithuania is opening up its little known traditions to the world and in the next decade it will become one of the most well-known European spa destinations with one of the best-developed markets.

The sleep hotel is just one of 13 wellness projects in Lithuania
 


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01 Oct 2020 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
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SELECTED ISSUE
Spa Business
2020 issue 1

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Leisure Management - Write to reply

Letters

Write to reply


Do you have a strong opinion, or disagree with somebody else’s point of view on topics related to the spa industry? If so, Spa Business would love to hear from you. Email your letters, thoughts and suggestions to [email protected]

A movement away from minimalist spas
Beverley Bayes, creative director, Sparcstudio
Beverley Bayes

Having worked on some of the top UK spas for the last decade, we’re witnessing a shift in design – away from formal and minimalist settings towards those with ‘heart and soul’.

The choice of finishes is moving away from plush and bling, for example, towards natural raw materials that recreate the kind of barefoot luxury found in island resorts. Think honed Forest Green marble rather than highly polished Calacatta marble, end grain timbers, green slate and terracotta tiles in interesting formats. There will also be a sway towards incorporating handmade, locally-sourced materials, artwork and furniture.

Rendered walls will give spas a new-found freedom for creating organic shapes using modern stone and polished plaster which, for instance, mimic the smoothness of Moroccan tadelakt. Concealed lighting will progressively replace spot and down lighting to give a softer, more integrated look and full spectrum bulbs means intensity can subtly change throughout the day in accordance to circadian rhythms.

We also expect to see natural swimming pools featuring freshwater and filtered by plants become an essential element for eco-conscious operators.

New luxury is about nurture, care, comfort, relaxation and connecting with nature.

There’s a sway towards handmade, locally-sourced materials, artwork and furniture in spas like South Lodge
Lithuania to become most well-known European spa destination
Eglé Ruksenaite, owner & founder, The E77 Company
Eglé Ruksenaite

The history of health prevention and medical spa towns, using local therapeutic mineral water and mud, dates back over 200 years in Lithuania.

However, while many spas were once owned and operated by the state, an economic crisis in the 1990s meant existing infrastructure was acquired by private companies. And in the next two years alone, another 13 spa hotels and wellness destinations are planned in the country. We’re consulting on more than half of these and, according to our calculations, total investments should amount to €90.5m (US$100.7m, £77.4m).

Today, people are visiting spa towns such as Birstonas, Druskininkai, Anyksciai and Palanga not just for rehabilitation, but also for health prevention and relaxation. Spas are treating contemporary ailments such as chronic fatigue and insomnia and many are adapting services to meet the needs of a younger generation and families.

With modernisation Lithuania is opening up its little known traditions to the world and in the next decade it will become one of the most well-known European spa destinations with one of the best-developed markets.

The sleep hotel is just one of 13 wellness projects in Lithuania

Originally published in Spa Business 2020 issue 1

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd