Promotional feature
The Wellness

Investing in children’s facilities gives a spa and wellness offering a competitive edge, as well as helping the next generation achieve their potential, explains Mohammed Ibrahim, CEO of industry design and consultancy practice, The Wellness


Albert Einstein once said “Play is the highest form of research”, explains Mohammed Ibrahim, CEO of industry design and consultancy practice, The Wellness. “My aim is to revive this philosophy and help our future generations develop and have fun, away from the stressful life we put them through.

“We want kids to be kids, learning without stress and enjoying life but how can we do this today? The high-tech life they live nowadays takes them away from the active, movement-filled life children used to live and creates a lot of problems with their social, visual and motor skills.

“It’s so important we give our children the right tools to adjust and stay healthy and socially intact. We must ensure we let them shine,” he says.

“When we talk about wellness for kids, we’re not talking about kids’ spas, we’re much more interested in how to help guide our new generation to develop and cope with life challenges,” he explains.

Children’s clubhouses
“The availability of children’s facilities – I’d call them children’s clubhouses – are a key consideration for consumers when choosing their next destination,” says Ibrahim, “so they should be a revenue generator, as well as offering what each parent seeks for their child and what each child needs.”

Ibrahim’s vision is to enable kids to re-learn the skills they’re losing due to modern life: “Our aim is to meet the needs of families and operators through a creative design approach that aims to make sure kids stay kids, but also learn while being active,” he says.

“Offering this kind of full experience that caters for children, while also giving parents the opportunity to ‘dream big’ in terms of their own wellbeing, is very important for spa and wellness operators.

The complete experience
“Parents must also be relieved of worry about their kids’ wellbeing and to know they’ll be playing, learning, experimenting and developing,” he says.

“My vision is for the creation of a kids club which is a complete experience – a place where children can grow, develop life skills and have fun, while creating a socially integrated community for all the family,” says Ibrahim.

“When developing children’s clubs, we take into account each location, the society and culture. This ensures we create every facility using a concept that’s unique and special in every way – every time,” says Ibrahim.

“Life challenges have a vital role to play in kids’ everyday lives, it shapes them into healthy, happy adults.”

The process
“When creating great children’s clubs, the assessment process is very important. This is conducted using observatory play research, where experts establish the development needs of the target audience,” explains Ibrahim.

“The most important aspects when designing any children’s facility are this research and understanding the daily operational challenges. This enables us to create custom-designed solutions and enhancement programmes designed to respect each child’s differences and visions.”

Children’s clubhouses - The Wellness Blueprint

Mohammed Ibrahim outlines the elements of play needed to inspire kids to have fun and gain confidence. Target age groups are toddlers, preschoolers and school-aged children. Each will have their own dedicated zones

The social zone

Here, kids learn behavioural skills, enjoy making friends, building their character and learning how to integrate with others and to deal with living successfully in society

Language development

Language development allows kids to learn how to express themselves by talking and making conversation, reading and storytelling, listening and expressing

The active zone

The place where kids use their body to develop their strength and endurance and their motor skills to achieve higher levels of physical literacy and better health and vitality

Visual perception

These activities help the brain make sense of what the eyes see. Visual perception has been shown to be closely associated with language processing

Auditory perception

This developmental element involves listening and explaining what you heard. We use auditory perception to enjoy the theatre or cinema, get attached to a story and then express our opinion

The Wellness has created concepts for children’s clubhouses to give spa and wellness developments a strong USP
 


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01 Oct 2020 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
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Spa Business
2020 issue 1

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Leisure Management - The Wellness

Promotional feature

The Wellness


Investing in children’s facilities gives a spa and wellness offering a competitive edge, as well as helping the next generation achieve their potential, explains Mohammed Ibrahim, CEO of industry design and consultancy practice, The Wellness

Mohammed Ibrahim, CEO of industry design and consultancy practice,
The Wellness has created concepts for children’s clubhouses to give spa and wellness developments a strong USP

Albert Einstein once said “Play is the highest form of research”, explains Mohammed Ibrahim, CEO of industry design and consultancy practice, The Wellness. “My aim is to revive this philosophy and help our future generations develop and have fun, away from the stressful life we put them through.

“We want kids to be kids, learning without stress and enjoying life but how can we do this today? The high-tech life they live nowadays takes them away from the active, movement-filled life children used to live and creates a lot of problems with their social, visual and motor skills.

“It’s so important we give our children the right tools to adjust and stay healthy and socially intact. We must ensure we let them shine,” he says.

“When we talk about wellness for kids, we’re not talking about kids’ spas, we’re much more interested in how to help guide our new generation to develop and cope with life challenges,” he explains.

Children’s clubhouses
“The availability of children’s facilities – I’d call them children’s clubhouses – are a key consideration for consumers when choosing their next destination,” says Ibrahim, “so they should be a revenue generator, as well as offering what each parent seeks for their child and what each child needs.”

Ibrahim’s vision is to enable kids to re-learn the skills they’re losing due to modern life: “Our aim is to meet the needs of families and operators through a creative design approach that aims to make sure kids stay kids, but also learn while being active,” he says.

“Offering this kind of full experience that caters for children, while also giving parents the opportunity to ‘dream big’ in terms of their own wellbeing, is very important for spa and wellness operators.

The complete experience
“Parents must also be relieved of worry about their kids’ wellbeing and to know they’ll be playing, learning, experimenting and developing,” he says.

“My vision is for the creation of a kids club which is a complete experience – a place where children can grow, develop life skills and have fun, while creating a socially integrated community for all the family,” says Ibrahim.

“When developing children’s clubs, we take into account each location, the society and culture. This ensures we create every facility using a concept that’s unique and special in every way – every time,” says Ibrahim.

“Life challenges have a vital role to play in kids’ everyday lives, it shapes them into healthy, happy adults.”

The process
“When creating great children’s clubs, the assessment process is very important. This is conducted using observatory play research, where experts establish the development needs of the target audience,” explains Ibrahim.

“The most important aspects when designing any children’s facility are this research and understanding the daily operational challenges. This enables us to create custom-designed solutions and enhancement programmes designed to respect each child’s differences and visions.”

Children’s clubhouses - The Wellness Blueprint

Mohammed Ibrahim outlines the elements of play needed to inspire kids to have fun and gain confidence. Target age groups are toddlers, preschoolers and school-aged children. Each will have their own dedicated zones

The social zone

Here, kids learn behavioural skills, enjoy making friends, building their character and learning how to integrate with others and to deal with living successfully in society

Language development

Language development allows kids to learn how to express themselves by talking and making conversation, reading and storytelling, listening and expressing

The active zone

The place where kids use their body to develop their strength and endurance and their motor skills to achieve higher levels of physical literacy and better health and vitality

Visual perception

These activities help the brain make sense of what the eyes see. Visual perception has been shown to be closely associated with language processing

Auditory perception

This developmental element involves listening and explaining what you heard. We use auditory perception to enjoy the theatre or cinema, get attached to a story and then express our opinion


Originally published in Spa Business 2020 issue 1

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd