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Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – email: [email protected]


Proper stretching technique is essential
Dan Rees, commercial director, Premier Global NASM
Dan Rees

I just wanted to express a view regarding a feature you ran in the January issue of HCM (Page 20-23) featuring a company called Flexology.

Several of the images show a considerable degree of stress being placed on vulnerable joints, with insufficient application of support or stabilisation. I am not in a position to comment on the credentials of Flexology or the experience of the practitioners featured in the images, but suggest this small selection of images featured do not support techniques we would endorse.

Assisted stretch can be hugely beneficial, improving mobility, stability and performance but the practice is very specialist and, if not performed correctly, there is a high risk of damage to ligaments, tendons and muscles. This can lead to joint instability, pain and ongoing mobility issues. It is, therefore, imperative that practitioners are adequately trained and have a full, in-depth understanding of the biomechanical and anatomical impact of their application.

Our students are taught basic and progressive assisted stretch techniques as part of the Level 3 Personal Training Diploma.

"Assisted stretch can improve mobility and performance, but the practice is specialist and – if not performed correctly – there’s a risk of damage"

Students who wish to extend their knowledge and practice in the area are advised to also complete The NASM Corrective Exercise Specialisation (NASM-CES). Here, techniques are incorporated into our four-step programme, The Corrective Exercise Continuum (CEx). This scientifically proven programme is designed to reduce muscular dysfunction, supporting clients in a quest to move, feel and live better.

HCM produces some excellent content and I am an avid supporter. I therefore feel I have a duty to question content that does not reflect what I believe, through years of training and education, to be true. I would be very interested to hear the views of other readers on this particular topic.

Right to reply
Tim Kayode, programme coordinator at Flexology
Qualified sports therapist and fascia stretch therapy (FST) Level 2 practitioner

All our Flexperts have been trained in our scientifically-backed assisted stretching method and prior to training, everyone is assessed to ensure they have an in-depth knowledge of anatomy and physiology.

We don’t want to give away our techniques, but our model has been inspired by FR and FRC. All of our Flexperts are highly trained and come from therapeutic backgrounds such as soft tissue, sports therapy, fascia stretch therapy and others.

All three in the pictures are qualified, so the knowledge we have in stretching, anatomy and physiology, rehab and manual therapy is more advanced than any PT qualification.

Further, it’s important to note that assisted stretching technique cannot be assessed from a marketing picture.

With regards to the hamstring stretch with unsupported knee, that is dependent on the client, as we deal with their individual issues. The picture in question shows someone who is highly flexible and is in the middle of an isometric contraction. If you give the knee too much support, this can lead to hyperextension.

The picture that depicts a glute stretch shows one of the ways that the stretch can be done by a female therapist. Because of the female anatomy, it cannot be done the same way as the male therapist would do this.

The stretches pictured are not part of the corrective exercise continuum programme, so it is not relevant to mention this here.

We understand the corrective exercise protocol covers the lengthening of muscles with a four-step process, however, we follow a protocol designed specifically for assisted stretching.

Our focus is assisted stretching and we are not a rehabilitation clinic and do not claim to be.

 


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SELECTED ISSUE
Health Club Management
2020 issue 3

View issue contents

Leisure Management - Write to reply

Letters

Write to reply


Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – email: [email protected]

Proper stretching technique is essential
Dan Rees, commercial director, Premier Global NASM
Dan Rees

I just wanted to express a view regarding a feature you ran in the January issue of HCM (Page 20-23) featuring a company called Flexology.

Several of the images show a considerable degree of stress being placed on vulnerable joints, with insufficient application of support or stabilisation. I am not in a position to comment on the credentials of Flexology or the experience of the practitioners featured in the images, but suggest this small selection of images featured do not support techniques we would endorse.

Assisted stretch can be hugely beneficial, improving mobility, stability and performance but the practice is very specialist and, if not performed correctly, there is a high risk of damage to ligaments, tendons and muscles. This can lead to joint instability, pain and ongoing mobility issues. It is, therefore, imperative that practitioners are adequately trained and have a full, in-depth understanding of the biomechanical and anatomical impact of their application.

Our students are taught basic and progressive assisted stretch techniques as part of the Level 3 Personal Training Diploma.

"Assisted stretch can improve mobility and performance, but the practice is specialist and – if not performed correctly – there’s a risk of damage"

Students who wish to extend their knowledge and practice in the area are advised to also complete The NASM Corrective Exercise Specialisation (NASM-CES). Here, techniques are incorporated into our four-step programme, The Corrective Exercise Continuum (CEx). This scientifically proven programme is designed to reduce muscular dysfunction, supporting clients in a quest to move, feel and live better.

HCM produces some excellent content and I am an avid supporter. I therefore feel I have a duty to question content that does not reflect what I believe, through years of training and education, to be true. I would be very interested to hear the views of other readers on this particular topic.

Right to reply
Tim Kayode, programme coordinator at Flexology
Qualified sports therapist and fascia stretch therapy (FST) Level 2 practitioner

All our Flexperts have been trained in our scientifically-backed assisted stretching method and prior to training, everyone is assessed to ensure they have an in-depth knowledge of anatomy and physiology.

We don’t want to give away our techniques, but our model has been inspired by FR and FRC. All of our Flexperts are highly trained and come from therapeutic backgrounds such as soft tissue, sports therapy, fascia stretch therapy and others.

All three in the pictures are qualified, so the knowledge we have in stretching, anatomy and physiology, rehab and manual therapy is more advanced than any PT qualification.

Further, it’s important to note that assisted stretching technique cannot be assessed from a marketing picture.

With regards to the hamstring stretch with unsupported knee, that is dependent on the client, as we deal with their individual issues. The picture in question shows someone who is highly flexible and is in the middle of an isometric contraction. If you give the knee too much support, this can lead to hyperextension.

The picture that depicts a glute stretch shows one of the ways that the stretch can be done by a female therapist. Because of the female anatomy, it cannot be done the same way as the male therapist would do this.

The stretches pictured are not part of the corrective exercise continuum programme, so it is not relevant to mention this here.

We understand the corrective exercise protocol covers the lengthening of muscles with a four-step process, however, we follow a protocol designed specifically for assisted stretching.

Our focus is assisted stretching and we are not a rehabilitation clinic and do not claim to be.


Originally published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 3

Published by The Leisure Media Company Ltd Portmill House, Portmill Lane, Hitchin, Herts SG5 1DJ. Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385 | Contact us | About us | © Cybertrek Ltd