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Write to reply

Fuel the debate about issues across the industry and share your ideas and experiences. We’d love to hear from you: [email protected]


The journey towards net zero carbon

We’ve taken an important next step towards powering our facilities with renewable energy with the announcement of our first green gym.

Charlton Lido and Lifestyle Club in South East London has a 350sq m gym with over 40 pieces of equipment, many of which are self-powered. Since installing a 38 kW solar array, the power generated has capacity to operate the gym entirely by renewable energy for the first time. The panels are delivering 35,000kWh of renewable power and saving seven tonnes of CO2 per annum.

Our social enterprise is all about making a difference for communities and the climate crisis is already having an effect on them.

We missed out on the government energy support given to cultural institutions, such as libraries and museums, so have made the investment from our capital reserves as part of our journey towards net zero carbon. Our HQ also has a solar array and battery storage.

The investment comes on the back of a multi-year journey to make the business more sustainable, reducing waste, CO2 and energy consumption under our Respecting the Planet corporate value. We’re also working closely with our partners to invest in the environment.

Customers and staff are benefitting, knowing that respecting the planet is an important part of the purposeful business they’ve chosen to be a part of.

Chris Hebblewhite / photo: GLL

"Reducing our impact on the environment aligns us with the ambitious goals of our local authority partners" – Chris Hebblewhite, GLL

The lifespan boost of physical activity
Ray Algar, Oxygen Consulting
Ray Algar / photo: Ray Algar

In April, I was excited to publish research – co-authored with Professor Les Mayhew, associate head of global research at the International Longevity Centre (ILC) – that increases our understanding of exercise and life expectancy.

It explores an intriguing question: do Commonwealth Games medallists live longer than their general population counterparts? We know athletes dedicate years to training, but does this translate into a longevity boost?

We analysed the lives of 4,000 male and female medallists covering 88 years of data, going back to the first Commonwealth Games in 1930 and discovered significant boosts – for example, 29 per cent in male swimmers and divers – equating to 5.3 extra years of life – and 25 per cent in male track athletes.

Weightlifters also showed a 24 per cent gain which translates to around 4.5 extra years of life, while female competitors across a range of sports experienced a 22 per cent increase, equating to 3.9 extra years of life.

Although we didn’t attempt to explain what was driving this, other studies have shown athletes are better protected from cardiovascular diseases, some cancers and respiratory diseases.

How can the global fitness industry use and message the results of this and other exercise-related longevity research? The exciting takeaway is that general population exercise studies, such as Generation 100, also discovered a boost – especially with higher intensity exercise (www.hcmmag.com/Generation100).

The clear message is that structured exercise and everyday physical activity are not only good for health but also for a longer life. The industry has a vital role to play in translating these findings into practice and encouraging more people to embrace physical activity. This is a powerful message at a time when the industry is seeking ways to articulate and amplify its impact.

As more consumers, employees, suppliers and investors seek mission-first, purposeful organisations to associate with, it’s rewarding to know organisations across the entire industry ecosystem are promoting this remarkable ‘product’ with such an effective ‘active ingredient.’

The other important message in this research is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach; different activities can have similar benefits, so everyone is free to choose the ones they identify with and enjoy.

This is a powerful message at a time when the industry is seeking ways to articulate and amplify its impact
Elite athletes spend years training, with huge boosts to longevity / photo: Shutterstock/Salty View
 


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19 Apr 2024 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
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SELECTED ISSUE
Health Club Management
2023 issue 5

View issue contents

Leisure Management - Write to reply

Letters

Write to reply


Fuel the debate about issues across the industry and share your ideas and experiences. We’d love to hear from you: [email protected]

Seven tonnes of CO2 are saved annually at GLL’s Charlton Lido and Lifestyle Club photo: GLL

The journey towards net zero carbon

We’ve taken an important next step towards powering our facilities with renewable energy with the announcement of our first green gym.

Charlton Lido and Lifestyle Club in South East London has a 350sq m gym with over 40 pieces of equipment, many of which are self-powered. Since installing a 38 kW solar array, the power generated has capacity to operate the gym entirely by renewable energy for the first time. The panels are delivering 35,000kWh of renewable power and saving seven tonnes of CO2 per annum.

Our social enterprise is all about making a difference for communities and the climate crisis is already having an effect on them.

We missed out on the government energy support given to cultural institutions, such as libraries and museums, so have made the investment from our capital reserves as part of our journey towards net zero carbon. Our HQ also has a solar array and battery storage.

The investment comes on the back of a multi-year journey to make the business more sustainable, reducing waste, CO2 and energy consumption under our Respecting the Planet corporate value. We’re also working closely with our partners to invest in the environment.

Customers and staff are benefitting, knowing that respecting the planet is an important part of the purposeful business they’ve chosen to be a part of.

Chris Hebblewhite / photo: GLL

"Reducing our impact on the environment aligns us with the ambitious goals of our local authority partners" – Chris Hebblewhite, GLL

The lifespan boost of physical activity
Ray Algar, Oxygen Consulting
Ray Algar / photo: Ray Algar

In April, I was excited to publish research – co-authored with Professor Les Mayhew, associate head of global research at the International Longevity Centre (ILC) – that increases our understanding of exercise and life expectancy.

It explores an intriguing question: do Commonwealth Games medallists live longer than their general population counterparts? We know athletes dedicate years to training, but does this translate into a longevity boost?

We analysed the lives of 4,000 male and female medallists covering 88 years of data, going back to the first Commonwealth Games in 1930 and discovered significant boosts – for example, 29 per cent in male swimmers and divers – equating to 5.3 extra years of life – and 25 per cent in male track athletes.

Weightlifters also showed a 24 per cent gain which translates to around 4.5 extra years of life, while female competitors across a range of sports experienced a 22 per cent increase, equating to 3.9 extra years of life.

Although we didn’t attempt to explain what was driving this, other studies have shown athletes are better protected from cardiovascular diseases, some cancers and respiratory diseases.

How can the global fitness industry use and message the results of this and other exercise-related longevity research? The exciting takeaway is that general population exercise studies, such as Generation 100, also discovered a boost – especially with higher intensity exercise (www.hcmmag.com/Generation100).

The clear message is that structured exercise and everyday physical activity are not only good for health but also for a longer life. The industry has a vital role to play in translating these findings into practice and encouraging more people to embrace physical activity. This is a powerful message at a time when the industry is seeking ways to articulate and amplify its impact.

As more consumers, employees, suppliers and investors seek mission-first, purposeful organisations to associate with, it’s rewarding to know organisations across the entire industry ecosystem are promoting this remarkable ‘product’ with such an effective ‘active ingredient.’

The other important message in this research is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach; different activities can have similar benefits, so everyone is free to choose the ones they identify with and enjoy.

This is a powerful message at a time when the industry is seeking ways to articulate and amplify its impact
Elite athletes spend years training, with huge boosts to longevity / photo: Shutterstock/Salty View

Originally published in Health Club Management 2023 issue 5

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