Awards
Good lookers

Architizer has celebrated the best of museum and culture architecture at the 11th annual A+ Awards. We check out the winners


Online architecture platform Architizer has highlighted culture and museums as part of its 2023 A+ Awards, which honour the best buildings and spaces around the world.

Several museums and cultural buildings were celebrated in the awards, including ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum, which was opened in the former flower market hall across from the main Jewish Museum Berlin in 2020, and the $94m Orange County Museum of Art, which opened to visitors in Costa Mesa, California, at the end of 2022.

For 2023, the awards programme welcomed 11 new categories focused on sustainable design. This decision was taken to emphasise the pivotal role designers have in confronting climate change and to shine a spotlight on those architects striving to improve the built environment for generations to come.

CATEGORY: Cultural – Gallery & Exhibition Spaces
Jury Winner: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin, Germany
Architect: Olson Kundig

Inspired by the pioneering vision of Noah’s Ark at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, which underscores the importance of diversity, collaboration and second chances, ANOHA — The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin seeks to give young guests a sense of hope and possibility. Located across from the Jewish Museum Berlin, the heart of ANOHA is a 7m-tall (23ft-tall) circular wooden ark.

More than 150 sculptural animals populate ANOHA’s ark, each created from found objects by a team of 18 German artists. This approach encourages children to consider the importance of recycling and adaptive re-use, while supporting ANOHA’s core philosophy of creativity and imagination. Interactive exhibits placed along an intuitive visitor pathway teach children how to solve problems independently and as a group, while exploratory spaces modelled after unique habitats allow children to experience the diverse perspectives of the various animals.

Sustainable strategies are embedded in the architectural design as an integral part of the user experience. Mechanical system needs are reduced thanks to the environmental buffer of the existing hall, significantly lowering energy loads. Ceiling fans and operable windows in the ark allow for air exchange and natural ventilation. The ark’s windows support this passive daylighting approach, while visually connecting ANOHA with the existing structure of the hall.

The exhibition designer for the project was IGLHAUT + von GROTE, and the lighting design was by Blieske Architects Lighting Designers.

A 7m-tall wooden ark lies at the centre of the Berlin children’s museum / Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff
More than 150 ‘animals’ populate the museum / Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff
Imaginative design was celebrated / Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff
CATEGORY Cultural – Museum
Jury winner: Orange County Museum of Art Costa Mesa, United States
Architect: Morphosis Architects

With flexible exhibition galleries, dedicated space for educational programming, and areas for public gathering, Orange County Museum of Art’s new building provides expanded access to the museum’s permanent collection, which comprises important works of modern and contemporary art from Southern California and the Pacific Rim, and to its world-class special exhibition programme.

Designed by Morphosis Architects, the museum’s new home was completed in 2022. The main floor is dedicated to reconfigurable open-span exhibition space, complemented by mezzanine, black-box, and jewel-box galleries that can accommodate temporary and permanent collection exhibitions spanning a variety of scales and mediums.

A spacious roof terrace, equivalent in size to 70 percent of the building’s footprint, serves as an extension of the galleries with open-air spaces that can be configured for installations, a sculpture garden, outdoor film screenings and events. A grand outdoor public stair curves toward the museum’s entry, creating dialogue with Connector, the monumental sculpture by Richard Serra at the heart of Segerstrom Center for the Arts. Linking the museum to the arts complex’s Argyros Plaza and adjacent performing arts venues, the stair was designed to be an inviting gathering space for pedestrians and visitors.

The design strategy choreographs a rich visitor experience, from approach and entry, to procession through the galleries, and finally, an invitation to linger on the steps, in the café, or in the museum store. The building’s relationship between indoor and outdoor space encourages visitors to “immerse themselves in the celebrated climate of southern California, where light, air, and space have influenced generations of artists,” according to the architects.

Glazed sections allow plenty of natural light / Photo: Mike Kelley
Orange County Museum of Art’s new home was designed by Morphosis / Photo: Mike Kelley
The design encourages a rich visitor experience, according to the Architizer judges / Photo: Jasmine Park
The museum is clad in white terracotta tiles / Photo: Joshua White
CATEGORY Cultural – Museum
Popular choice winner Museum of Ethnography Budapest, Hungary
Architect: Napur Architect Ltd

The new home for the Museum of Ethnography, designed by Napur Architects, opened in May 2022. Realised as part of the Liget Budapest Project – a major redevelopment of Budapest’s 100-hectare City Park – the museum joins Sou Fujimoto’s House of Hungarian Music, which also opened in City Park last year.

The Museum of Ethnography opened in 1872 – it explores ethnographic science, European ethnology and cultural anthropology. The collection, which comprises 250,000 items, has been exhibited in various locations, but has never had a purpose built facility designed specifically to meet its needs.

According to the Architizer judges, the new building is distinguished by a “dynamic yet simple design harmonised with the natural environment of the park while communicating with the urban texture of its surroundings.

“The gently curving lines enable the building to function as a gateway linking the city and the park. The spectacular trademark of the building is the glass curtainwall surrounding the landscaped roof garden, consisting of nearly half a million pixels inserted into a laser-cut aluminium grid by a special robot.

“The building’s design hides a number of technological solutions, with its arched wings supported by a post-tensioned structure used in the construction of bridges.”

The museum now has a purpose built home / Photo: Museum of Ethnography
Curving lines link the city and the park, which houses the museum’s new home / Photo: Museum of Ethnography
CATEGORY Cultural – Pavilions
Jury winner Locust Grove Event Pavilion
Architect: De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop

Completed in 2022, this project is a new multi-use, open air pavilion located on the grounds of Locust Grove, a 55-acre 18th-century farm site and National Historic Landmark in Louisville, Kentucky.

Locust Grove operates as a historic interpretive site and museum on the remaining William Croghan estate that consists of a Georgian farmhouse and outbuildings built by enslaved African Americans, emphasising the legacy of George Rogers Clark – Revolutionary war hero and the founder of Louisville – who lived at the property.

Presidents James Monroe and Andrew Jackson, John James Audubon, Cassius Marcellus Clay, and explorers Lewis and Clark were welcomed to Locust Grove by its owners to rest, campaign and duel. Now a National Historic Landmark, Locust Grove is a unique example of early Kentucky architecture, craftsmanship, and history.

When designing the new event pavilion, the architects took inspiration from the property’s collection of historic buildings, using a predominant material palette of stone and timber to create the single storey building.

Drawing on a key feature of Locust Grove’s 18th century Georgian mansion, the pavilion’s form evokes the idea of a large-scale porch. Limestone is combined with a spectacular timber roof canopy – profiled glulam beams are infilled with decorative secondary framing to create a coffered ceiling that recalls the sinewy texture of the black locust tree bark.

The pavilion has been designed for a range of events, including performances, musical events, weddings and celebrations.

Access to the pavilion is multi-directional and site-specific, reinforcing a porous threshold from the west and forming a broad open canopy to the east.

Careful positioning of the pavilion minimises its visual impact in the landscape and frames important views.

Presidents and explorers were welcomed to Locust Grove to rest, campaign and duel
Photo: De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop
CATEGORY: Cultural – Pavilions
Popular choice winner Osage Park Pavilion
Architect: Modus Studio

The Osage Park Pavilion is a gateway and centrepiece for Osage Park, a scenic green space located at the northern end of a small municipal airport in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The airport is seen as a destination as well as transport hub, attracting unique, small aircraft and featuring a restaurant, flight school, flying club and store. Taking this as inspiration, the architects have designed a pavilion that derives its playful form and structural expression from aircraft wing design. The simple, fluid form lifts seamlessly out of the ground, evolving into a light, airy structure that celebrates natural light pouring through repetitive structural elements and the dynamic, undulating Arkansas-sourced cypress facade.

The pavilion acts as a hub within the larger park and contains a covered gathering space, restrooms, green room, and an outdoor stage and amphitheatre that anchors the eastern edge of the 55-acre recreational area. As the pavilion rises out of the park, the green roof becomes a viewing platform for visitors to watch planes take off and land.

The existing wetlands at Osage Park remain and play several roles, including water purification, water storage, and processing of carbon and other nutrients. Boardwalks are used for circulation throughout the park to preserve existing wetland and riparian areas. Other green infrastructure includes wetland buffers and the introduction of native plants to help clean contaminated land and restore a more natural aquatic environment.

Modus Studio’s Osage Park Pavilion acts as a gateway for Osage Park in Arkansas / Photo: Modus Studio Timonthy Hursley
The design was inspired by aeroplane wings / Photo: Modus Studio Timonthy Hursley
CATEGORY Unbuilt Cultural
Jury Winner Pabellón Centro de Cultura Ambiental Mexico City, Mexico
Architect: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura

This planned pavilion, designed by Mexico-based architecture firm A-001 Taller de Arquitectura, aims to help visitors enjoy the biodiversity of the local region while raising awareness of the challenges and solutions around climate change.

The key element is an ethnobotanical garden surrounding the pavilion, in which the biocultural heritage of the principal local plant species are exhibited and divided into five categories according to their uses: edible, toxic, religious, medical, and those used for building.

The garden works as an extension of the pavilion’s layout, with rectangular plots set on a series of platforms that follow the natural slope of the land and integrate harmoniously as a ‘reminder of the pyramidal foundations of Mexico’s native culture’.

The irrigation system takes advantage of the height differences between the platforms, allowing gravity to transport the water from the bio-pond fed by water from Lago Menor to each plot, reducing operating costs and returning excess water to the subsoil by an infiltration wetland.

The centre aims to showcase the biocultural heritage of the Valley of Mexico / Photo: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura
Visitors will learn about local biodiversity / Photo: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura
The planned pavilion features a green roof / Photo: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura
CATEGORY Unbuilt cultural
Popular choice winner Maison Sedimentation Montreal, Canada
Architect: Studio Fei

Located in the historic harbour of old Montreal, Maison Sédimentation by Studio Fei seeks to vitalise a historical townhouse while maintaining its authenticity.

Currently owned by a local art foundation that plans to convert it into a contemporary gallery and cultural centre, it was built around 1770 onto the foundations of an older building, and is clad in Montreal graystone. It features a characteristic sloped roof meant to discourage snow build up and raised end walls that serve as firebreaks.

Taking inspiration from the concept of sedimentation, the architect decided to celebrate the ‘layer upon layer of the construction, demolition and partial recycling of physical boundaries and foundations’ to create a new space for displaying art and hosting cultural events.

“The rich history has resulted in complex circulations and varying elevations in this building. Thus deciding on a strategy of intervention required an honest assessment of what was feasible. It is impossible to meet the basic needs of an exhibition space while completely preserving and restoring the current structure,” said the architect.

Studio Fei’s proposal sees new and old come together, with an all-white extension added to the original building, keeping elements of the old structure including the topography and “slat-like organisation of spaces”.

The aim, according to the architect, is to create “a palimpsest of physical building layers that can accommodate the programme of a contemporary art museum while preserving the authenticity of the original.”

The space will serve as an exhibition venue, hosting a range of art and cultural events.

Studio Fei’s design aims to turn a heritage townhouse into a vibrant arts hub / Photo: Studio Fei
The building is owned by a local art foundation / Photo: Studio Fei
 


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SELECTED ISSUE
Attractions Management
2023 issue 3

View issue contents

Leisure Management - Good lookers

Awards

Good lookers


Architizer has celebrated the best of museum and culture architecture at the 11th annual A+ Awards. We check out the winners

ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum aims to give visitors hope Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff

Online architecture platform Architizer has highlighted culture and museums as part of its 2023 A+ Awards, which honour the best buildings and spaces around the world.

Several museums and cultural buildings were celebrated in the awards, including ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum, which was opened in the former flower market hall across from the main Jewish Museum Berlin in 2020, and the $94m Orange County Museum of Art, which opened to visitors in Costa Mesa, California, at the end of 2022.

For 2023, the awards programme welcomed 11 new categories focused on sustainable design. This decision was taken to emphasise the pivotal role designers have in confronting climate change and to shine a spotlight on those architects striving to improve the built environment for generations to come.

CATEGORY: Cultural – Gallery & Exhibition Spaces
Jury Winner: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin, Germany
Architect: Olson Kundig

Inspired by the pioneering vision of Noah’s Ark at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, which underscores the importance of diversity, collaboration and second chances, ANOHA — The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin seeks to give young guests a sense of hope and possibility. Located across from the Jewish Museum Berlin, the heart of ANOHA is a 7m-tall (23ft-tall) circular wooden ark.

More than 150 sculptural animals populate ANOHA’s ark, each created from found objects by a team of 18 German artists. This approach encourages children to consider the importance of recycling and adaptive re-use, while supporting ANOHA’s core philosophy of creativity and imagination. Interactive exhibits placed along an intuitive visitor pathway teach children how to solve problems independently and as a group, while exploratory spaces modelled after unique habitats allow children to experience the diverse perspectives of the various animals.

Sustainable strategies are embedded in the architectural design as an integral part of the user experience. Mechanical system needs are reduced thanks to the environmental buffer of the existing hall, significantly lowering energy loads. Ceiling fans and operable windows in the ark allow for air exchange and natural ventilation. The ark’s windows support this passive daylighting approach, while visually connecting ANOHA with the existing structure of the hall.

The exhibition designer for the project was IGLHAUT + von GROTE, and the lighting design was by Blieske Architects Lighting Designers.

A 7m-tall wooden ark lies at the centre of the Berlin children’s museum / Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff
More than 150 ‘animals’ populate the museum / Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff
Imaginative design was celebrated / Photo: ANOHA – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Yves Sucksdorff
CATEGORY Cultural – Museum
Jury winner: Orange County Museum of Art Costa Mesa, United States
Architect: Morphosis Architects

With flexible exhibition galleries, dedicated space for educational programming, and areas for public gathering, Orange County Museum of Art’s new building provides expanded access to the museum’s permanent collection, which comprises important works of modern and contemporary art from Southern California and the Pacific Rim, and to its world-class special exhibition programme.

Designed by Morphosis Architects, the museum’s new home was completed in 2022. The main floor is dedicated to reconfigurable open-span exhibition space, complemented by mezzanine, black-box, and jewel-box galleries that can accommodate temporary and permanent collection exhibitions spanning a variety of scales and mediums.

A spacious roof terrace, equivalent in size to 70 percent of the building’s footprint, serves as an extension of the galleries with open-air spaces that can be configured for installations, a sculpture garden, outdoor film screenings and events. A grand outdoor public stair curves toward the museum’s entry, creating dialogue with Connector, the monumental sculpture by Richard Serra at the heart of Segerstrom Center for the Arts. Linking the museum to the arts complex’s Argyros Plaza and adjacent performing arts venues, the stair was designed to be an inviting gathering space for pedestrians and visitors.

The design strategy choreographs a rich visitor experience, from approach and entry, to procession through the galleries, and finally, an invitation to linger on the steps, in the café, or in the museum store. The building’s relationship between indoor and outdoor space encourages visitors to “immerse themselves in the celebrated climate of southern California, where light, air, and space have influenced generations of artists,” according to the architects.

Glazed sections allow plenty of natural light / Photo: Mike Kelley
Orange County Museum of Art’s new home was designed by Morphosis / Photo: Mike Kelley
The design encourages a rich visitor experience, according to the Architizer judges / Photo: Jasmine Park
The museum is clad in white terracotta tiles / Photo: Joshua White
CATEGORY Cultural – Museum
Popular choice winner Museum of Ethnography Budapest, Hungary
Architect: Napur Architect Ltd

The new home for the Museum of Ethnography, designed by Napur Architects, opened in May 2022. Realised as part of the Liget Budapest Project – a major redevelopment of Budapest’s 100-hectare City Park – the museum joins Sou Fujimoto’s House of Hungarian Music, which also opened in City Park last year.

The Museum of Ethnography opened in 1872 – it explores ethnographic science, European ethnology and cultural anthropology. The collection, which comprises 250,000 items, has been exhibited in various locations, but has never had a purpose built facility designed specifically to meet its needs.

According to the Architizer judges, the new building is distinguished by a “dynamic yet simple design harmonised with the natural environment of the park while communicating with the urban texture of its surroundings.

“The gently curving lines enable the building to function as a gateway linking the city and the park. The spectacular trademark of the building is the glass curtainwall surrounding the landscaped roof garden, consisting of nearly half a million pixels inserted into a laser-cut aluminium grid by a special robot.

“The building’s design hides a number of technological solutions, with its arched wings supported by a post-tensioned structure used in the construction of bridges.”

The museum now has a purpose built home / Photo: Museum of Ethnography
Curving lines link the city and the park, which houses the museum’s new home / Photo: Museum of Ethnography
CATEGORY Cultural – Pavilions
Jury winner Locust Grove Event Pavilion
Architect: De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop

Completed in 2022, this project is a new multi-use, open air pavilion located on the grounds of Locust Grove, a 55-acre 18th-century farm site and National Historic Landmark in Louisville, Kentucky.

Locust Grove operates as a historic interpretive site and museum on the remaining William Croghan estate that consists of a Georgian farmhouse and outbuildings built by enslaved African Americans, emphasising the legacy of George Rogers Clark – Revolutionary war hero and the founder of Louisville – who lived at the property.

Presidents James Monroe and Andrew Jackson, John James Audubon, Cassius Marcellus Clay, and explorers Lewis and Clark were welcomed to Locust Grove by its owners to rest, campaign and duel. Now a National Historic Landmark, Locust Grove is a unique example of early Kentucky architecture, craftsmanship, and history.

When designing the new event pavilion, the architects took inspiration from the property’s collection of historic buildings, using a predominant material palette of stone and timber to create the single storey building.

Drawing on a key feature of Locust Grove’s 18th century Georgian mansion, the pavilion’s form evokes the idea of a large-scale porch. Limestone is combined with a spectacular timber roof canopy – profiled glulam beams are infilled with decorative secondary framing to create a coffered ceiling that recalls the sinewy texture of the black locust tree bark.

The pavilion has been designed for a range of events, including performances, musical events, weddings and celebrations.

Access to the pavilion is multi-directional and site-specific, reinforcing a porous threshold from the west and forming a broad open canopy to the east.

Careful positioning of the pavilion minimises its visual impact in the landscape and frames important views.

Presidents and explorers were welcomed to Locust Grove to rest, campaign and duel
Photo: De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop
CATEGORY: Cultural – Pavilions
Popular choice winner Osage Park Pavilion
Architect: Modus Studio

The Osage Park Pavilion is a gateway and centrepiece for Osage Park, a scenic green space located at the northern end of a small municipal airport in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The airport is seen as a destination as well as transport hub, attracting unique, small aircraft and featuring a restaurant, flight school, flying club and store. Taking this as inspiration, the architects have designed a pavilion that derives its playful form and structural expression from aircraft wing design. The simple, fluid form lifts seamlessly out of the ground, evolving into a light, airy structure that celebrates natural light pouring through repetitive structural elements and the dynamic, undulating Arkansas-sourced cypress facade.

The pavilion acts as a hub within the larger park and contains a covered gathering space, restrooms, green room, and an outdoor stage and amphitheatre that anchors the eastern edge of the 55-acre recreational area. As the pavilion rises out of the park, the green roof becomes a viewing platform for visitors to watch planes take off and land.

The existing wetlands at Osage Park remain and play several roles, including water purification, water storage, and processing of carbon and other nutrients. Boardwalks are used for circulation throughout the park to preserve existing wetland and riparian areas. Other green infrastructure includes wetland buffers and the introduction of native plants to help clean contaminated land and restore a more natural aquatic environment.

Modus Studio’s Osage Park Pavilion acts as a gateway for Osage Park in Arkansas / Photo: Modus Studio Timonthy Hursley
The design was inspired by aeroplane wings / Photo: Modus Studio Timonthy Hursley
CATEGORY Unbuilt Cultural
Jury Winner Pabellón Centro de Cultura Ambiental Mexico City, Mexico
Architect: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura

This planned pavilion, designed by Mexico-based architecture firm A-001 Taller de Arquitectura, aims to help visitors enjoy the biodiversity of the local region while raising awareness of the challenges and solutions around climate change.

The key element is an ethnobotanical garden surrounding the pavilion, in which the biocultural heritage of the principal local plant species are exhibited and divided into five categories according to their uses: edible, toxic, religious, medical, and those used for building.

The garden works as an extension of the pavilion’s layout, with rectangular plots set on a series of platforms that follow the natural slope of the land and integrate harmoniously as a ‘reminder of the pyramidal foundations of Mexico’s native culture’.

The irrigation system takes advantage of the height differences between the platforms, allowing gravity to transport the water from the bio-pond fed by water from Lago Menor to each plot, reducing operating costs and returning excess water to the subsoil by an infiltration wetland.

The centre aims to showcase the biocultural heritage of the Valley of Mexico / Photo: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura
Visitors will learn about local biodiversity / Photo: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura
The planned pavilion features a green roof / Photo: A-001 Taller de Arquitectura
CATEGORY Unbuilt cultural
Popular choice winner Maison Sedimentation Montreal, Canada
Architect: Studio Fei

Located in the historic harbour of old Montreal, Maison Sédimentation by Studio Fei seeks to vitalise a historical townhouse while maintaining its authenticity.

Currently owned by a local art foundation that plans to convert it into a contemporary gallery and cultural centre, it was built around 1770 onto the foundations of an older building, and is clad in Montreal graystone. It features a characteristic sloped roof meant to discourage snow build up and raised end walls that serve as firebreaks.

Taking inspiration from the concept of sedimentation, the architect decided to celebrate the ‘layer upon layer of the construction, demolition and partial recycling of physical boundaries and foundations’ to create a new space for displaying art and hosting cultural events.

“The rich history has resulted in complex circulations and varying elevations in this building. Thus deciding on a strategy of intervention required an honest assessment of what was feasible. It is impossible to meet the basic needs of an exhibition space while completely preserving and restoring the current structure,” said the architect.

Studio Fei’s proposal sees new and old come together, with an all-white extension added to the original building, keeping elements of the old structure including the topography and “slat-like organisation of spaces”.

The aim, according to the architect, is to create “a palimpsest of physical building layers that can accommodate the programme of a contemporary art museum while preserving the authenticity of the original.”

The space will serve as an exhibition venue, hosting a range of art and cultural events.

Studio Fei’s design aims to turn a heritage townhouse into a vibrant arts hub / Photo: Studio Fei
The building is owned by a local art foundation / Photo: Studio Fei

Originally published in Attractions Management 2023 issue 3

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