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First person
Viva Las Vegas

Lisa Starr tries out a next-generation signature facial at Fontainebleau Las Vegas – the newest and tallest hotel on The Strip. But does the experience soar above expectations?


In development for 15 years and costing US$3.7 billion (€3.4 billion, £2.9 billion), the Fontainebleau Las Vegas finally opened in December. This newest and tallest hotel on The Strip, which has 3,644 rooms, features a soaring entry canopy and airy, modern lobby, evocative of its sister hotel, the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Helmed by Vegas spa veteran Jennifer Lynn, the 55,000sq ft Lapis Spa is spread over two floors, with 44 treatment rooms and expansive men’s, women’s and co-ed thermal areas providing saunas, steam rooms, vitality pools, heated loungers and zero gravity recliners.

I visited to experience the US$330 (€306, £262) Lapis Signature Facial, listed on the menu as 90-minutes “designed to bring out the best in your skin”. This next-level treatment utilises GeneoX – a facial machine which launched last year.

Pops of blue
The tone for my spa journey is set by large, well-equipped locker rooms decorated in neutrals but brightened by pops of blue furniture – the tables in this case, but later on sofas in the thermal area. It’s a purposeful colour which pays tribute to the spa’s namesake, lapis lazuli, a deep blue crystal associated with qualities of power and wisdom. I also noticed a bow tie motif dotted subtly around the property, a signature of Morris Lapidus, the architect of the original Miami location.

The tasteful and calming interiors continue throughout with other highlights including a Celestial Waters multi-sensory room with communal healing waters, customised by season, time of day and desired mood and one of the largest event saunas in the US boasting a massive video screen and several aufguss sessions daily. The Starry Night and ReBoot Lounges were delightful too.

Traditional meets tech
Lying on a Gharieni treatment bed, my aesthetician, Claudia, quickly established a connection with me by gently pressing her hands on my body and feet and relaxing me with deep breathing accompanied by chimes. A nice touch before launching into the facial.

The GeneoX is a fascinating device which combines effective skincare tools and products with an experiential component, all packaged in an intuitive computer interface. As well as using a wand to deliver an ultrasound step and massage, Claudia performed an excellent hands-on lymphatic drainage massage. Additional components included a cryotherapy massage with ice-cold globes and the application of a Knesko eye mask while putting my face under a Celluma LED face shield, during which time my hands and arms were also massaged.

I’m usually ready to get up after 60 minutes on a treatment table, but the 90 minutes passed easily. The treatment was well-paced and the result was glowing and hydrated skin which lasted for several days – not easy to achieve in the desert climate.

My closing thoughts are that this facial is emblematic of what’s required for today’s treatment-savvy clients. Spa-goers of the moment are looking for more than a regular facial steam and massage. Incorporating modern technology tools while maintaining conventional and personalised, hands-on components is the recipe for the facial of today.

photo: Lisa Starr

"This facial is emblematic of what’s required for today’s treatment-savvy clients" – Lisa Starr

About GeneoX

GeneoX, a fresh device on the professional spa scene, delivers “a next-generation facial” in three steps

• Oxfoliation™: a cleansing and exfoliating process where OxyPods react with a Primer Gel to create a bubbly, CO2-rich environment on the skin’s surface

• Ultrasound: micro-vibrations are used to stimulate and condition the skin, as well as to increase its permeability to help with nutrient absorption

• Massage: a gentle massage works on lymphatic drainage to help sculpt and detox the face

The device offers pre-scheduled and customisable protocols and six ingredient blends to target specific skin concerns – whether customers want a Glam Facial treatment with gold flakes, a Hydrate Facial with blue spirulina and niacinamide or go for other options to illuminate, detox, balance or revive.

Starr was impressed with the layering of tech and manual therapies / photo: GeneoX
Relaxation lounges were delightful, says Starr Credit: photo: DREX Agency_Mark Mediana
 


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SELECTED ISSUE
Spa Business
2024 issue 1

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Leisure Management - Viva Las Vegas

First person

Viva Las Vegas


Lisa Starr tries out a next-generation signature facial at Fontainebleau Las Vegas – the newest and tallest hotel on The Strip. But does the experience soar above expectations?

The 55,000sq ft spa has tasteful and calming interiors photo: DREX Agency_Mark Mediana
Relaxation lounges were delightful, says Starr photo: DREX Agency_Mark Mediana

In development for 15 years and costing US$3.7 billion (€3.4 billion, £2.9 billion), the Fontainebleau Las Vegas finally opened in December. This newest and tallest hotel on The Strip, which has 3,644 rooms, features a soaring entry canopy and airy, modern lobby, evocative of its sister hotel, the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Helmed by Vegas spa veteran Jennifer Lynn, the 55,000sq ft Lapis Spa is spread over two floors, with 44 treatment rooms and expansive men’s, women’s and co-ed thermal areas providing saunas, steam rooms, vitality pools, heated loungers and zero gravity recliners.

I visited to experience the US$330 (€306, £262) Lapis Signature Facial, listed on the menu as 90-minutes “designed to bring out the best in your skin”. This next-level treatment utilises GeneoX – a facial machine which launched last year.

Pops of blue
The tone for my spa journey is set by large, well-equipped locker rooms decorated in neutrals but brightened by pops of blue furniture – the tables in this case, but later on sofas in the thermal area. It’s a purposeful colour which pays tribute to the spa’s namesake, lapis lazuli, a deep blue crystal associated with qualities of power and wisdom. I also noticed a bow tie motif dotted subtly around the property, a signature of Morris Lapidus, the architect of the original Miami location.

The tasteful and calming interiors continue throughout with other highlights including a Celestial Waters multi-sensory room with communal healing waters, customised by season, time of day and desired mood and one of the largest event saunas in the US boasting a massive video screen and several aufguss sessions daily. The Starry Night and ReBoot Lounges were delightful too.

Traditional meets tech
Lying on a Gharieni treatment bed, my aesthetician, Claudia, quickly established a connection with me by gently pressing her hands on my body and feet and relaxing me with deep breathing accompanied by chimes. A nice touch before launching into the facial.

The GeneoX is a fascinating device which combines effective skincare tools and products with an experiential component, all packaged in an intuitive computer interface. As well as using a wand to deliver an ultrasound step and massage, Claudia performed an excellent hands-on lymphatic drainage massage. Additional components included a cryotherapy massage with ice-cold globes and the application of a Knesko eye mask while putting my face under a Celluma LED face shield, during which time my hands and arms were also massaged.

I’m usually ready to get up after 60 minutes on a treatment table, but the 90 minutes passed easily. The treatment was well-paced and the result was glowing and hydrated skin which lasted for several days – not easy to achieve in the desert climate.

My closing thoughts are that this facial is emblematic of what’s required for today’s treatment-savvy clients. Spa-goers of the moment are looking for more than a regular facial steam and massage. Incorporating modern technology tools while maintaining conventional and personalised, hands-on components is the recipe for the facial of today.

photo: Lisa Starr

"This facial is emblematic of what’s required for today’s treatment-savvy clients" – Lisa Starr

About GeneoX

GeneoX, a fresh device on the professional spa scene, delivers “a next-generation facial” in three steps

• Oxfoliation™: a cleansing and exfoliating process where OxyPods react with a Primer Gel to create a bubbly, CO2-rich environment on the skin’s surface

• Ultrasound: micro-vibrations are used to stimulate and condition the skin, as well as to increase its permeability to help with nutrient absorption

• Massage: a gentle massage works on lymphatic drainage to help sculpt and detox the face

The device offers pre-scheduled and customisable protocols and six ingredient blends to target specific skin concerns – whether customers want a Glam Facial treatment with gold flakes, a Hydrate Facial with blue spirulina and niacinamide or go for other options to illuminate, detox, balance or revive.

Starr was impressed with the layering of tech and manual therapies / photo: GeneoX

Originally published in Spa Business 2024 issue 1

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