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Editor's letter
Cool customers

Record temperatures around the world will force spa and wellness operators to adapt the way they do business, with nocturnal societies the inevitable outcome in some places and coolcationing becoming attractive to consumers


As I write, the G7 Summit is concluding at Italian wellness destination, Borgo Egnazia, with world leaders committing to increase their efforts to combat the climate crisis.

In spite of good intentions such as these, however, climate change is already severely impacting lives and businesses all around the world.

This ongoing crisis has underpinned a substantial proportion of our coverage in Spa Business for many years and this edition of the magazine is no exception.

On p26, actor Richard Gere discusses his fervent support for regenerative development, while on p40, Robert Hanea, CEO of Therme Group, emphasises that the sustainability focus driving its business model is essential for maintaining its affordable pricing.

Both investors and consumers are increasingly channelling their resources into companies with strong ESG credentials, a topic we explore in-depth on p52.

With 2023 the hottest year on record and projections indicating billions will soon face unsurvivable heat in countries in the middle of the world, the spa and wellness industry must continue to adapt. We expect demand for retreats off-season and in cooler climates – termed ‘coolcationing’ – to increase, prompting forward-thinking investors to consider regions more distant from the equator.

Spa Business first reported on polar tourism five years ago (see www.spabusiness.com/polartourism). While places such as Scandinavia, Canada, Iceland and the Baltic are emerging as alternative destinations.

In hotter regions, nocturnal societies will become prevalent as people adjust to avoid intense daytime heat. To capture this market, operational hours will extend into the night, which could increase staffing and operational costs or the need for staffless concepts.

This strategy will lead to growing demand for cool treatments, aligning with growing interest in therapies such as cold water immersion, cryotherapy and contrast bathing. We also anticipate the introduction of night-time spa packages, including outdoor ‘cool’ tubs under the stars, moonlit yoga and late-night, cooling aromatherapy massages.

These changes will appeal not only to coolcationers but also to night owls, shift workers and travellers seeking unique experiences.

By embracing these trends, the industry will grow and diversify, while mitigating the impact of a warming climate.

photo: Jack Emmerson

Katie Barnes is the editor of Spa Business magazine | [email protected]

 


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18 Jul 2024 Leisure Management: daily news and jobs
 
 
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SELECTED ISSUE
Spa Business
2024 issue 2

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Leisure Management - Cool customers

Editor's letter

Cool customers


Record temperatures around the world will force spa and wellness operators to adapt the way they do business, with nocturnal societies the inevitable outcome in some places and coolcationing becoming attractive to consumers

Operators will extend operating hours and get creative with night-time packages photo: shutterstock/dragon images

As I write, the G7 Summit is concluding at Italian wellness destination, Borgo Egnazia, with world leaders committing to increase their efforts to combat the climate crisis.

In spite of good intentions such as these, however, climate change is already severely impacting lives and businesses all around the world.

This ongoing crisis has underpinned a substantial proportion of our coverage in Spa Business for many years and this edition of the magazine is no exception.

On p26, actor Richard Gere discusses his fervent support for regenerative development, while on p40, Robert Hanea, CEO of Therme Group, emphasises that the sustainability focus driving its business model is essential for maintaining its affordable pricing.

Both investors and consumers are increasingly channelling their resources into companies with strong ESG credentials, a topic we explore in-depth on p52.

With 2023 the hottest year on record and projections indicating billions will soon face unsurvivable heat in countries in the middle of the world, the spa and wellness industry must continue to adapt. We expect demand for retreats off-season and in cooler climates – termed ‘coolcationing’ – to increase, prompting forward-thinking investors to consider regions more distant from the equator.

Spa Business first reported on polar tourism five years ago (see www.spabusiness.com/polartourism). While places such as Scandinavia, Canada, Iceland and the Baltic are emerging as alternative destinations.

In hotter regions, nocturnal societies will become prevalent as people adjust to avoid intense daytime heat. To capture this market, operational hours will extend into the night, which could increase staffing and operational costs or the need for staffless concepts.

This strategy will lead to growing demand for cool treatments, aligning with growing interest in therapies such as cold water immersion, cryotherapy and contrast bathing. We also anticipate the introduction of night-time spa packages, including outdoor ‘cool’ tubs under the stars, moonlit yoga and late-night, cooling aromatherapy massages.

These changes will appeal not only to coolcationers but also to night owls, shift workers and travellers seeking unique experiences.

By embracing these trends, the industry will grow and diversify, while mitigating the impact of a warming climate.

photo: Jack Emmerson

Katie Barnes is the editor of Spa Business magazine | [email protected]


Originally published in Spa Business 2024 issue 2

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